Speaking Phase 1 prompt

This IELTS Speaking Phase 1 prompt is taken from Cambridge English IELTS Book 10; University of Cambridge ESOL Examination by Vanessa Jakeman and Clare McDowell.

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Speaking Phase 2 & 3 prompts

Speaking part 2 & 3 phases are related with each other. You can check previous posts on speaking part 2 that is individual long turn and part 3 which is a two way discussion.

the attached prompt is for both phases 2 & 3 taken from Cambridge English IELTS Book 7. Look at the topic card and make a mind map, you have one minute to brainstorm your ideas, you can make notes if you want and use them during your talk. In the last phase the examiner will ask you questions related to the topic in part 2.

It is good if you record yourself.

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Speaking part 2 & 3 prompts

Speaking part 2 & 3 phases are related with each other. You can check previous posts on speaking part 2 that is individual long turn and part 3 which is a two way discussion.

the attached prompt is for both phases 2 & 3 taken from Cambridge English IELTS Book 10. Look at the topic card and make a mind map, you have one minute to brainstorm your ideas, you can make notes if you want and use them during your talk. In the last phase the examiner will ask you questions related to the topic in part 2.

It is good if you record yourself.

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Signpost your Language!

Following activity tells you how to use a range of discourse markers / connectives when answering typical speaking part 3 style questions (e.g. speculate, compare, agree / disagree).

Can you distinguish between the two sentences below, which one is easier?

A:  “We eat unhealthy food and don’t get enough exercise. A lot of people can’t control their weight.”

B:   “I think it’s because we eat unhealthy food and don’t get enough exercise. That’s the main reason that a lot of people can’t control their weight.”

What do you think?

Yes. The second one because you used signposting words – it’s because…, that’s the main reason that…

For worksheet 1, read some candidates’ answers to questions in part 3 of the Speaking test. What was the topic?

Worksheet 1

Complete the table below with phrases from worksheet 1. Can you add any phrases of your own?

Worksheet 2

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Answer Key

Source: http://www.britishcouncil.org/

speaking prompt for part I

Today I am giving you a prompt for IELTS speaking part I.

  • Read these questions carefully;
  • make a mind map as big as you can;
  • start explaining all the points you have included in your mind map;
  • if possible try to record yourself;
  • you can check the previous post “say it better” to understand how to answer.

Tell me about your home.
Do you live in a flat or a house?
What are some good things about your home?
Are there any bad things?
Which is better, living in a house or a flat? Why?

IMPORTANT

It is not necessary that you speak truth. You just need to show that how you speak English; can you explain things clearly; do you have confidence to speak well?

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Examples

1.  Tell me about your home. Do you live in a flat or a house?

Do not say just “house” or “flat”. Explain your “house” or “flat” in detail. size of your house; rooms; lawn; garden; front-yard or backyard; etc.

2.  What are some good things about your home?

its airy; have backyard; lawn where you go in the evening or morning; have tea; read books in your lawn; which areas of your home do you like most; why you like them; how they look; what are the things which make them look good; how you feel when you go in those particular areas;

3. Are there any bad things?

Do not say “yes” or “no” but explain it. a room has no window and it is so dark; backyard is too small; outside there is no space for your pet.

4. Which is better, living in a house or a flat? Why?

explain in detail the merits and demerits.

if its house you can say that it has lawns, front-yard or backyard.

if its flat say it is airy, you can see the sun rise and sun set easily everyday.

Source: http://www.britishcouncil.org/